Speech-Language Delay/Disorder FAQ
  What do speech-language pathologists (speech therapists) do?

Speech-language pathologists are sometimes called speech therapists. Speech-language pathologists assess and treat (provide speech therapy) adults and children with speech and/or language delays or disorders. Some speech-language pathologists work with individuals with swallowing disorders.

What is a language delay/disorder?

Individuals with a language disorder often have difficulty expressing themselves with words or difficulty understanding what they have heard. These individuals may experience difficulty with grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing or spelling. Children with a language delay may not develop language as quickly as their same age peers and when they do develop language, that language may be disordered. [1]

Speech disorders include:

Articulation disorders
Phonological disorders (sometimes classified as a disorder of language)
Fluency/Stuttering disorders
Voice disorders

What is an articulation disorder?

Individuals with articulation disorders often have difficulty forming the speech sounds needed to communicate with others. Sounds can be substituted, left off, added or changed. Children with articulation disorders are often not as intelligible (clear) as their same age peers. [2]

What is a phonological disorder?

A phonological disorder is similar to an articulation disorder. A phonological disorder involves patterned sound production errors. For instance, an individual with a phonological disorder may substitute all sounds made in the back of the mouth (/g/, and /k/) for those in the front of the mouth (/d/ and /t/). The individual may say "tup" for "cup". Children with phonological disorders are often not as intelligible (clear) as their peers. [3]

What is a fluency (stuttering) disorder?

Stuttering is a speech disorder in which the flow of speech is disrupted by repetitions, prolongations, or abnormal stoppages (no sound) of sound and syllables. Stuttering may be accompanied by motor (nonverbal) behaviors such as eye blinking, head movements, tongue clicking etc. [4]

What is a Voice Disorder?

Individuals with voice disorders have deviations in voice quality (breathy, hoarse, etc.), pitch (too high, etc.), loudness, or resonance (hyponasal/hypernasal). Individuals who misuse their voice may develop vocal nodules and vocal polyps. [5]

What percentage of the population has a speech/language disorder?

Approximately 10% of the population has a communication disorder. Of this percentage, 50-80% may have an articulation and phonological disorder. [6]
12-14% of school-age children have language disorders. [7]
Approximately 1% of the U.S. population stutters. [4]

What cities does Dr. Silver serve?

Plano, Dallas, Frisco, Allen, McKinney, Richardson, Carrollton, Lewisville and Irving.


[1] American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA). http://www.asha.org/; Roseberry-McKibbin, Celeste, and Hedge, M. N. (Giri). An Advanced Review of Speech-Language Pathology. Austin: Pro-Ed, 2006.

[2] American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA). http://www.asha.org/; MedlinePlus. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001430.htm

[3] American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA). http://www.asha.org/; Pena-Brooks, Adriana, and Hedge, M. N. Assessment & Treatment of Articulation and Phonological Disorders in Children. Austin: Pro-Ed, 2000.

[4] Stuttering Foundation of America. http://www.stuttersfa.org/Default.aspx?tabid=17

[5] American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA). http://www.asha.org/

[6] Pena-Brooks, Adriana, and Hedge, M. N. Assessment & Treatment of Articulation and Phonological Disorders in Children. Austin: Pro-Ed, 2000.

[7] Roseberry-McKibbin, Celeste, and Hedge, M. N. (Giri). An Advanced Review of Speech-Language Pathology. Austin: Pro-Ed, 2006.

 
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